USA Football
Happy New year!

Happy New Year! Welcome to the 2018 Season. We are looking forward to a successful season.

 
2018 NYS Elite Athletic Football Clinics
Exciting 2018 Events with NYS Elite Athletics:
Football Team Camp - (July 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th) http://nyseliteathletics.com/finger-lakes-team-camp
Youth Football Camp - (July 23rd, 24th and 25th) http://nyseliteathletics.com/finger-lakes-youth-camp
 
Rob Meehan Honored with the Willie Lightfoot Youth Advocate of the Year Award

https://mhflsentinel.com/dinolfo-and-county-legislators-honor-2017-youth-award-recipients/

Robert Meehan (center) accepts the Willie Lightfoot Youth Advocate of the year Award at the Monroe County Youth Awards Night last month. Submitted photo to the Mendon*Honeoye Falls*Lima Sentinel dated July 6, 2017

WILLIE W. LIGHTFOOT YOUTH ADVOCATE OF THE YEAR

Robert Meehan, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472, Legislative District 5

Rob has been involved in the Honeoye Falls community for years and has been especially active in youth athletics.

Rob began coaching HFL youth football over thirty years ago and has been president of the organizations for the past eight years.
Rob has been consistently devoted to young athletes in the community and continues to build athletic programs in the community.

 
NFF Scholarship 2017

2017-2018 Football Player and Cheerleader Scholar-Athlete NFF Nomination Form

Youth, High School, & College Scholar Athletes

Minimum requirements are a B average and either an All-League Selection, or Captain, Community service is preferred but not required. Every school in Section V should have one high school senior to honor at the banquet. One youth nominee per program. Youth award winners should be at B team or A team level (5th Grade and above). Top high school candidates will be eligible for scholarship money for college. To receive a scholarship, award winner must be present or have a representative from his school present to receive the award.

*Coaching Staffs, Teachers and School Administrators all invited to attend this event*

(To be considered, your application must be received by Friday, October 27, 2017)

SUGGESTED CRITERIA FOR PLAYER AND CHEERLEADER SCHOLAR-ATHLETE AWARDS

Our committee feels that there is at least one member of your team that exemplifies the characteristics to which this award is given. We are looking for someone that shows the ability and attitude to play the game of football well. However, academic success and community service are as compelling qualifications for nominating someone for this award. Ideally, the player you nominate will have achievement in all three of these areas. Please do not neglect to nominate someone from your program.

Application for High School, College, or Youth Player and Cheerleader Student-Athletes

Based on: 1. Outstanding football ability, performance, and attitude (40%), 2. Outstanding academic application and
achievement (40%), 3. Outstanding campus (school) / community leader (20%).

All Applications must be submitted electronically:

Email: wade.bianco@ndhsbatavia.com

 
Message from Youth Umpire Coordinator
Regarding expected conduct, please remind your coaches, players, and spectators, that the referee crews are under orders to comply with a Zero Tolerance policy. If a player, coach, or spectator is acting in a manner that is detrimental to the game, and impacting others, they WILL be removed immediately and without warning. There's no place in youth sports for that behavior.

Thanks
Ken Torchia
Youth Umpire Coordinator
 
Message from League President Regarding Code of Conduct
Of course it is always the League's point of view and expectation that all coaches and team officials will act with the highest level of sportsmanship in everything they do and will hold their spectators to a similar level. Above all, we encourage you to talk to one another. Last year we had a significant issue because ultimately President's didn't communicate effectively, soon enough. Already this year that same thing has poked its evil little head up.

Remember, if at no other time, make a special effort over the next 9 weeks to talk to one another and not take your ball and go home when things aren't working to your liking. Almost every President we talk to wants the very same things we are asking for here, but it is up to all of you to make it happen.
 
FLYFCL Youth Presidents/Coaches/Official Interpretation Meeting

The Fingerlakes Youth Presidents, Coaches and Officials interpretation will be held on August 10th, 7 pm at the Phelps American Legion.

This meeting is mandatory for every president and head football coach.

Recent Question/Discussion - Coaches on the field during a contest I would like to see penalty administration/enforcements consistant to High School rules.
1st Offence - Warning
2nd Offence - 5yd penalty
3rd Offence - 15yd penalty (1st unsportsmanlike)
4th Offence - 15yd penalty (2nd unsportsmanlike - coach disqualification)
If an official runs into a coach that is on the field of play or any sideline penalty is deemed to be flagrant, the referee will immediately enforce an unsportsmanlike foul and "possible" disqualification. A second unsportsmanlike foul is always a disqualification.
Sideline restricted area. Coaches, trainers, statisticians, players, are not to be in the restricted area at the snap. However, at this level this rule is a gray area for officials depending on existing sideline decorum. I would like to discuss this at our meeting then be sure that our officials are also clear on our conversation.
Any questions please contact Bob Patterelli.
 
HEAT WARNING

Remember to check the heat index and plan your practice activities accordingly

Heat Index under 95°

All sports:

  • Provide ample amounts of water. This means water should always be available and athletes should take in as much water as they desire.
  • Optional water breaks every 30 minutes for 10 minutes duration.
  • Ice-down towels for cooling
  • Watch/monitor athletes carefully for necessary action

Heat Index 95° to 99°

All sports:

  • Provide ample amounts of water. This means water should always be available and athletes should take in as much water as they desire.
  • Mandatory water breaks every 30 minutes for 10 minutes duration.
  • Ice-down towels for cooling
  • Watch/monitor athletes carefully for necessary action

Contact sports:

Reduce time of outside activity. Consider postponing practice to later in the day

Re-check temperature and humidity every 30 minutes to monitor for increased Heat Index

Heat index 100° to 104°

All sports:

  • Provide ample amounts of water. This means water should always be available and athletes should take in as much water as they desire.
  • Mandatory water breaks every 30 minutes for 10 minutes duration.
  • Ice-down towels for cooling
  • Watch/monitor athletes carefully for necessary action
  • Alter uniform by removing items if possible
  • Reduce time of outside activity as well as indoor activity if air conditioning unavailable
  • Postpone practice to later in day if possible

Contact sports and activities with additional equipment

Re-check temperature and humidity every 30 minutes to monitor for increased Heat Index

Heat index above 104°

All sports:

  • Stop all outside activity in practice and/or play, and stop all inside activity if air conditioning is unavailable.

 
Playing HS football as safe as band, glee club or choir...
Posted Feb 11, 2015

High school football's benefits outweigh the risks

Created on Thursday, 04 December 2014 00:00 | Written by Ed Riley |

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My son’s high school football team finished 1-9 this year, and I wouldn’t be prouder of this team if they had gone undefeated.

They made a game of it each Friday night, and while they often were outnumbered and overmatched, they never were outplayed. My son and his teammates have learned more about hard work, sportsmanship and resilience on the football field than anywhere else, and these lessons will make them better men.

But as much as I enjoy the tradition of high school football, I worry about its future.

My son’s school has nearly 2,000 students, but his team is lucky to suit up 20 players for a varsity game. There are a lot more young men who want to play, but whose parents won’t let them. Their parents think the risk of brain injury outweighs the benefits of playing.

I understand the concerns and share them, but I have concluded those concerns are misplaced. My children are the most important part of my life. I am a widower, and when my son wanted to play football his freshman year, every mom and my in-laws chastised me for considering it. Even President Obama wondered whether he’d let his theoretical son play.

I’m a physician and medical researcher at Stanford, and I only decided to let my son play after reviewing the medical research.

The study that best elucidates the risk of football-related brain injury comes from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDCP officials studied 3,439 former National Football League players with at least five years of pension-credited playing seasons between 1959 and 1988.

This is arguably the highest-risk group of players available for study. Among these players, the incidence of neurodegenerative disease is three times higher than in the general population. However, the risk of death from neurodegenerative disease was relatively low in both groups: 3 percent in NFL players, and 1 percent in the general population. The risk associated with a long NFL career is not insignificant but remains small.

The high-profile research that is regularly cited as connecting the dots between football-related concussions and dementia in NFL players lacks sufficient data to establish a causal link. Most of the cases considered focus on former NFL players involved in a lot of high-risk behavior other than football, and none of these studies included a control group. Research like this is typically filed away as “interesting, but we need better data.”

The key here is that high school football is not the NFL. The Mayo Clinic found that the risk of high school football players developing degenerative neurological diseases later in life is no greater than if they had been in the band, glee club or choir.

The data suggests that the normal life of adolescents puts them at risk for brain injury all the time. What would be the alternatives to my son playing football? Sports such as soccer, skiing, rock climbing or lacrosse have similar risk profiles to high school football.

My late wife rode horses competitively growing up. As an anesthesiologist at a hospital that treats more horse-related trauma accidents than any other in the country, I’m glad my son went with football.

I believe the benefits of playing high school football are worth the risks. Football is an equal-opportunity sport. All different types of athletes make up a football team, the skills needed don’t require years of practice, and there is no real advantage for kids with private coaches. A healthy, average athlete who shows up to all the team’s practice sessions and attends off-season weight training can usually find a spot on the team.

My son’s teammates are from the whole socioeconomic and racial spectrum. The only reason that his team was able to make a contest out of each game, despite that they had so few players to work with, is that the boys learned how to build on what they had in common instead of focusing on their differences.

As Jack Kemp, the former pro quarterback and congressman, once said, “The huddle is color-blind.” In an increasingly diverse world, opportunities to learn how to work together with a wide range of people who start out on equal footing should not be lightly dismissed.

When I sit in the stands, I worry when my 160-pound son lines up on the front line of the kick return team, but that is only slightly less than I worry when I sit in the passenger seat as he merges onto the highway. Adolescence is a scary time for parents.

To all you parents who are keeping your sons from playing football, I say, “Let them play.” They are just as safe on the football field as they are in most of the other sports and activities we regard as a necessary part of a healthy adolescence. You can save money on expensive club sports and specialty coaches, and your sons will develop skills that will serve them and the rest of us well.

Ed Riley, 56, is the younger brother of Oregon State football coach Mike Riley and is a former quarterback at Whitworth. He has two sons and a daughter. The youngest boy, Noah, is a senior quarterback at Gunn High in Palo Alto, Calif. Ed Riley works as a professor of anesthesia at Stanford University.

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FLYFCL Youth Coaches trained
Posted Apr 7, 2012

In 2012 Finger Lakes Youth Football became a league Affiliated partner with USA Football, youth football's national governing body.  While on the surface the season will look very much the way it has for the last 20 years huge changes are afoot.  While coaches at all levels have had to be certified by NYSCA there was no set training standard for player safety, quality of drills, and quality of preparation.  This year all FLYFCL football coaches at every level are required to become certified through USA Football by taking the only nationally accredited coaches training course.  This 15 chapter course covers the fundamentals of football, safe tackling, equipment fitting, and concussion awareness, It is FLYFCL's hope that an increased emphasis on education, improved resources, and support will improve your child's experience in football and injuries will be minimized. 

For years our coaches have been comitted to teaching our kids about the game they love.  They have always done so with passion and comittment and without pay.  Unfortunately, all too often they have also done it without the highest level of support.  Now that that support is available through USA Football Coaching Certification, FLYFCL has taken advantage of it.  When you see your player's coach, thank him or her for taking the extra time and comittment to make your player's experience and safety better than it has ever been before.



 
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FLYFCL Calendar
 
Events
  • Penn Yan Youth Cheer Competition

    Posted May 21, 2018
    Penn Yan Youth Cheer Competition

    Penn Yan Youth Cheer Competition

    When: October 20th, 8am doors open

    Where: Penn Yan Academy, 305 Court Street, Penn Yan

    Who: Teams B, C, and Flag

    Cost: $35/team

    See link for registration

     

  • Battle of the Bows

    Posted March 26, 2018

    As your seasons are quickly approaching- Please, MARK YOUR CALENDARS! Wayne Central High school is holding their Fourth Annual Youth Competition and we would love to have your team be a part of this! If you could please pass on to your youth coordinator or teams we would greatly appreciate this!

     

    Date: 10/13/2018

    Location: Wayne Central High school

    Time: Competition will be begin promptly at 9am

     

    Registration forms will be emailed and posted to our website once available!

     

    Stephanie lee

    stlee@logs.com and scarafos@yahoo.com

    Wayne Cheerleading, Program Director and Varsity Coach

     

    Tanya Forrest

    wayneeaglescheer@yahoo.com

    Wayne Cheerleading Booster Club, President

  • Panther Bow Down

    Posted March 26, 2018
    Panther Bow Down


    Panther Bow Down

    Youth Cheerleading Competition

    Open to all recreation youth squads: Flag, C, B, and A squads

    ALL participants will receive their placement ribbon, we will be placing the top 4 teams.

    Saturday October 20, 2018
    Gananda High School
    3195 Weidrick Rd Walworth NY 14568

    Doors will open at 8:00 a.m.
    Competition begins at 9:00 a.m.

    Flag and C Squads will compete in the a.m.; after a short break, B and A squads will compete in the p.m.

    Following each session prior to awards will be a Jump Off and a Tumble Off.  Cost of Jump Off or Tumble Off is $5 each per contestant. Register for Jump/ Tumble off by 9 am for Flag and C and prior to second half starting for A and B.  Contestants will go against their own level.  Winner will receive a ribbon. 

    Please contact me if you plan on attending or if you have questions:

    Ann Miller-Michaels

    Amiller-Michaels@merkel.com

    585.615.8204

 
Cheer Competition Tickets